Made In France: Paraboot Michael Meets Bon Chic, Bon Genre

Founded in Paris by way of the Alp-straddling village of Izeaux in 1908 by Remy Richard, Paraboot has grown over the last century to become one of the most respected French footwear brands around. The Paraboot ethos is to craft footwear that can last any form of walk no matter how far, thanks to the […]

Paraboot Micheal On Foot

Founded in Paris by way of the Alp-straddling village of Izeaux in 1908 by Remy Richard, Paraboot has grown over the last century to become one of the most respected French footwear brands around. The Paraboot ethos is to craft footwear that can last any form of walk no matter how far, thanks to the use of the famed Norwegian welt to join the soles and the uppers. All French made and manufactured other than the finest rubber soles which have been carefully selected and shipped in, Paraboot’s range of shoes and boots can be relied on all year round. Priding themselves in their French manufacturing, Paraboot’s craft has been grounded in the historical background of the French industry, a human adventure, made possible by the combined efforts of passionate women and men; a family that linked its destiny to the company’s of now 4 generations.

The Paraboot Michael Shoe is one of the original and revered shoes ever created by Paraboot – the moc toe shoe style became highly popular during the 1980’s among the ‘Bon Chic, Bon Genre’ movement and was also commonly seen in 1930’s French thrillers. The Michael was always intended to be a daily working shoe for the “everyman” with the goal of creating a fine tuned balance of class, durability and waterproofing with Paraboots iconic Michael Norwegian welted construction. Norwegian welted for people in the know within footwear means the sole is sewn to the uppers in a way which has many more benefits than the more common welting – Norwegian welting is more waterproof, helps control temperature inside more freely, provides a more sturdy construction and also merges more comfortably to the shape of your foot over time. Being high quality waterproof shoes means Paraboot Micheal’s have some weight to them – not in the sense of steel capped work boots but rather in the sense of quality shoes with purpose built to last. The Paraboot Micheal represents proper, sensible shoes for people who want something better than others out there.

Paraboot Micheals can be worn in many stylings with all types of pants, socks and stylings. One of the most popular styles attached to wearing the Paraboot shoe is the classic Americana and British inspired preppy heritage style, think Take Ivy, Polo Ralph Lauren, Beams Plus and Barbour. Looking closer to the home country, Paraboot and its true French heritage directly links back to the similarly smart preppy movement of ‘Bon Chic, Bon Genre’. The genre describes the aspirational lifestyle of the upper middle-class and lower upper class and translates literally to good taste (mostly in clothing and accessories) and good manners (not standing out among your peers) and grew organically from the the post-World War II good fortune in France. Another aspect of the BCBG movement was also maintaining your possessions alongside wearing them, making sure they last and not leaving the house with a mark on your shirt or your shoes fresh. The movement was even more defined when an almost competing and alternative upper lifestyle appeared around 1968: the Bobo or Bourgeois Bohème which became the “Champagne Socialist” group of France, each sticking to their clear cut lifestyle choices and style. For young people within France, more specifically Paris, these style tribes were similar to ones seen in streetwear, skate and punk movements and were at their core a way for peers to recognize each other and their interests.

The Made in France Paraboot Micheal Shoe. Online now.

Paraboot Micheal On Foot Walking
Paraboot Micheal On Foot Walking
Paraboot Micheal On Foot Sat Down
Paraboot Micheal On Foot
Paraboot Micheal On Foot and walking
Paraboot Micheal On Foot and walking

New For AW20 – C.P. Company

Founded in Italy in 1971 by Massimo Osti, C.P. Company was named after the Chester Perry factory where one of Massimo’s favorite comic strip characters worked at in Bristow comic series printed in daily newspapers. The forward thinking designer is now recognized as an icon in outerwear design and is also well known for starting […]

C/P. Company Multi Pocket Fisherman Vest

Founded in Italy in 1971 by Massimo Osti, C.P. Company was named after the Chester Perry factory where one of Massimo’s favorite comic strip characters worked at in Bristow comic series printed in daily newspapers. The forward thinking designer is now recognized as an icon in outerwear design and is also well known for starting sister label Stone Island. Massimo worked from his experience as a graphic designer and quickly created a distinctive style of communicating for his company by conducting research and design into military uniforms and work suits, C.P. became known for its functional, military-inspired outerwear and the use of innovative fabrics, dye processing techniques and shapes.

Since the early days, the brand has been solely focused on reinventing the playing field when it comes to the basic aspects of a mans wardrobe and its needs. Based on the principals of functionality and experimentation, the Italian label quickly began making a name for themselves and stood out vastly from competition when it came to innovation, construction and technical prowess decades ahead of the rest.

Founder of C.P. Company Massimo Osti (1944-2005)

Massimo Osti (1944-2005) was born and raised in Bologna, Italy and has become world renowned for his influential work with C.P. Company and Stone Island. Quietly beginning his career in the fashion industry in 1968 as an advertising graphic designer, Osti quickly started beginning his own personal projects designing t-shirt graphics for the brand ‘Chomp Chomp’. Showcasing his forward thinking mindset, Osti used new techniques such as four colour process and silk-screen to create a placed-print based collection which quickly gained traction. A few years later, Osti then formed C.P. Company where his love affair with technology, design and marketing would begin.

In the early 1980s, Osti began to focus his efforts on promoting C.P. Company through new marketing techniques without allowing it to be to the detriment of his research. Otsi curated and published the C.P. Company magazine from 1985 with became an iconic showcase of the brands collections in a very direct way selling the lifestyle of the brand. Osti established the magazine with seasonal editions, producing more than 50,000 copies in English, Italian and Japanese. Each issue was globally distributed which was a bold plan at the time as newsagents at that time only sold newspapers and glossy commercial magazines. However, it was an immediate success and helped elevate the brand, Osti went on to feature iconic figures such as 3-time Formula 1 World Champion Nelson Piquet to create further mainstream interest in the brand and added prestige. Marketing material that had to be purchased, rather than being distributed freely, gave the C.P. magazine greater value and represented a departure from the norm of free catalogues within the fashion industry. C.P. Company products were featured in an unpretentious way throughout; garments were simply placed on a white background like objects of design and made the brand more down to earth for the everyday man with taste. During an interview in 1998, Osti described the C.P. Company magazine as “a gesture of trust, very well repaid, with regards to my audience’s ability to judge; the power of my strategy is the product. I am sure that the consumer recognizes signs of the technological process and formal aesthetic research behind the clothing”.

Vintage C.P. Company Seasonal magazines
C.P. Company 1988 Mile Migilia Goggle Jacket


One of the most iconic and powerful products within C.P. Company’s history is the Goggle Jacket and related lens arm branding – a interest which began after Osti’s time spent researching protective hoods used in the Japanese Civil Defence, he then became determined to find a solution that would allow him to sew lenses directly into the fabric of a singular jacket hood. Following initial teething problems which were fixed after discussions with sportswear lens experts Baruffaldi, the brand released a small run of prototype jackets which featured the goggles placed onto an extended collar. Digging deeper into this type of garment, Massimo began exploring military equipment, anti-gas clothing and Swiss field jackets, using them as source material to craft one of C.P. Company’s most famous goggle jackets in 1988, the Mile Migilia. The jacket was named after the prestigious road race in which many of the drivers wore the now sought after style, the Mille Miglia featured goggles placed directly into the hood with a lens wrist viewer to the sleeve which allowed the racer to view his watch through the jacket adding further functionality to this iconic creation.

Continuing the legacy of the brand from 1971, today C.P. Company continues to deliver revolutionary dyeing techniques and unique fabrication across wide collections which include field jackets, soft shell goggle jackets, lens sleeve sweatshirts, and more.

New for AW20: C.P. Company – available online now and in Leeds.

C.P. Company Multi Pocket Fisherman Vest
Pertex Down Filled Arm Lens Jacket
C.P. Company Pertex Down Filled Arm Lens Jacket
C.P. Company Taylon L Pocket Overshirt

Delight In Every Step: How The Reebok x Adsum Club C Was Born

This Autumn, New York based menswear label Adsum have worked with Reebok for the second time to create a Winter appropriate take on the ever-popular Club C silhouette. We caught up with Pete Macnee (Founder/Designer) and Christian Rice (Partner/Creative Director) of Adsum alongside Reebok’s Global Collaborations Manager Leo Gamboa to learn more about the chocolate […]

HIP Delight In Every Step: How The Reebok x Adsum Club C Was Born

This Autumn, New York based menswear label Adsum have worked with Reebok for the second time to create a Winter appropriate take on the ever-popular Club C silhouette. We caught up with Pete Macnee (Founder/Designer) and Christian Rice (Partner/Creative Director) of Adsum alongside Reebok’s Global Collaborations Manager Leo Gamboa to learn more about the chocolate inspired design.

Firstly, how are things going during these turbulent 6 months? 

PETE: I think it’s been tough for everyone individually. I had my first child April 1 when things really kicked off with COVID in NYC, Tommy Wan was isolated in his apartment solo and Matt’s GF got COVID. All that being said, Adsum continues to feel the support from our customers which we really appreciate. The Archive Sale was really successful and it’s something we’ll build on.

CHRISTIAN: Turbulent is the right word. This business is a lot, to borrow a phrase from Pete, like “trying to take a sip from a firehose” normally; so all this this has just taken that feeling to the next level. So much changes day to day but we’re rolling with the punches and remain optimistic about what’s ahead.

What lessons have you taken from isolation and the current state of the world recently?


PETE: Don’t take things for granted. We’re all in this together.


CHRISTIAN: From a business side, I look back and am just thankful for the team we have and the work we’ve done before all this happened. It proves that it’s the work that’s done in the background, that nobody sees, that matters the most. From a personal side it just crystallized what is truly important and what is trivial. As one of my college friend used to say incessantly, “Health is wealth”.


You both collaborated on the Pyro model not too long ago, how did you guys first connect?


PETE: I met Leo through a mutual friend and he was working at Packer at the time. He came by a sample sale event that we had at a rental unit in Soho and we stayed in touch. I’d say we lucked out by having Leo in the position he’s in and him having faith in the vision/product we produce.


CHRISTIAN: Leo is a jacket guy as much as he is a shoe guy so I remember the first time I met him at that event, he really liked one of our jackets and wanted to buy a sample that we didn’t even have for sale. I remember thinking how nice and unexpected that was of someone who we barely knew to want to support a young brand that no one had heard of yet. It didn’t matter to him, he liked the jacket so he wanted to support. It’s a testament to the type of person Leo is and why we feel lucky to have met him.

LEO: A good friend of mine Marcel Pena put me on to Adsum.  He invited me to one of their sample sales and we have been connected since then.


Now Adsum is working with Reebok on the Club C which is a favourite for many, how did you land on this style?


PETE: The Club C is one of Reebok’s most iconic styles. It’s a perfect thing that has stood the test of time so we wanted to reimagine the great shoe. It’s a shoe that is in our weekly rotation before doing the collaboration on it.

Delight In Every Step: How The Reebok x Adsum Club C Was Born
CHRISTIAN: Test run on an old pair of shoes. Looks like dinner that night was a bottle of Cabernet and some perogies. I had to use a hammer and screwdriver to break up the block of chocolate to melt.
Delight In Every Step: How The Reebok x Adsum Club C Was Born
CHRISTIAN: The quarantine approved photo shoot in the apartment.

Tell us more about the concept for the design of the shoe and how it came about?


CHRISTIAN: I think it all started from the desire to make a highly wearable shoe. The Pyro was a specific idea of being true to what a 90s running shoe was to us with the fluorescent hits and a bright optimistic color palette. With this one, we took a moment and looked around the office and, although we like mixing it up, the shoes we reach for day in and day out tend to be casual tonal shoes. I think Pete mentioned how versatile a brown sneaker is through the ages. Whether you’re a kid and trying to be clever by getting away with wearing sneakers instead of a dress shoe with your uniform, or you’re an older chiller who wants a good pair of shoes to go with a pair of jeans, you can reach for it. It’s versatile but you also have to be a certain type of person to want pull off a brown shoe. It’s a design that felt very true to the ethos of the brand.

LEO: It was pretty simple. We both wanted to work on a classic court shoe so the Club C was choice.  We did sample a few different colors but the brown really stood on its own – the color and material execution is really amazing. 

The chocolate marketing imagery is genius and flips the idea of the shoe well – where did this originate?


CHRISTIAN: Like most things, it just came from all of us shooting the shit in the office, talking about things we like and that have caught our eye recently. I had been getting into old skate advertising at the time. Ads from around the 90s when the actual skateboarders, not companies riding what they thought was a trend, were really starting to take ownership of their image, brands and voices. Brands like Droors and World Industries, and anyone taking ads out in Big Brother. I think the stuff they did back then is still some of the best ads I’ve seen. There was one image in particular from that time that I couldn’t stop thinking about. It was a close up of Rob Dyrdek face with a cigarette in his mouth covered in blue paint. I thought we could recreate something similar and maybe even more desirable if it involved food instead of paint. Chocolate worked perfectly in so many ways.

Delight In Every Step: How The Reebok x Adsum Club C Was Born
Delight In Every Step: How The Reebok x Adsum Club C Was Born


Were there any particular challenges in the design process that Adsum fan’s may not be aware of?


PETE: Timelines. We’ve been working on this shoe for a while and it’s taken a few kicks at the can to make sure all materials and colors are exactly what we’re after.

 
How and where do you plan to wear your Adsum Club C’s?


CHRISTIAN: I think the beauty of the shoe is you can wear it anywhere and anytime and I plan on doing that. I’m not super picky when it comes to matching my shoe to my activity. Age has forced me to wear dedicated running shoes when I go running, but my personality is more akin to people who wear their timberlands to the gym because they’re coming from their construction job and they don’t want to worry about carrying around an extra pair of shoes. I’m probably just as likely to wear these on a hike as I am to wear them to the supermarket.


PETE : You can put them in the microwave, heat them up and eat them if you need to

LEO: It is a great everyday shoe so I don’t see where I wouldn’t wear them!


What’s next for Adsum and Reebok in 2020 and beyond?

CHRISTIAN: Hopefully more shoes and continuing telling our story and serving the people that support us. 

LEO: Adsum and Reebok have been a great partnership for the past few seasons and we really appreciate the stylist approach that Adsum has towards our collaborations. This project is a great mix of amazing design, materials and storytelling. We will continue the relationship and work towards another time to reconnect.

The Reebok x Adsum Club C will be launching at HIP on 25/09/20 online at 08:00am and in Leeds.

Delight In Every Step: How The Reebok x Adsum Club C Was Born


Exploring The World Of Vintage New Order Merch With Ladi Kazeem

In conjunction with the release of the adidas Spezial AW20 Chapter 2 _nwrdrSPZL collection, we caught up with vintage dealer Ladi Kazeem of TheVaultMCR to delve into the deep history of vintage New Order merch. Hi Ladi, please introduce yourself and The Vault? My name is Ladi Kazeem i’m currently living in East London but I’m originally from Saltburn […]

HIP Exploring The World Of Vintage New Order Merch With Ladi Kazeem

In conjunction with the release of the adidas Spezial AW20 Chapter 2 _nwrdrSPZL collection, we caught up with vintage dealer Ladi Kazeem of TheVaultMCR to delve into the deep history of vintage New Order merch.

Hi Ladi, please introduce yourself and The Vault?

My name is Ladi Kazeem i’m currently living in East London but I’m originally from Saltburn a beach town in the North East of England a stones throw away from Middlesbrough. I started TheVaultMCR in 2014 – to be short my landlord at the time came to pick up my rent from my then bedroom and got a shock of her life as it was literally wall to wall vintage clothing. She then spoke to a friend who owned a shop in the Manchester NQ incognito which is now FLOK and he offered me his basement free to store all my vintage and sell from for free as long as I cleaned out the basement. The name the vault came from the fact that there was 10×10 cast iron bank vault in the basement and that became the centerpiece of the space.

You previously worked in a traditional vintage, how did this progress to selling tees full time?

The progression was really easy from 2007 to around 2014 I sold everything and anything I believed was valuable to keep my head above water there was no curation to it or interesting methodology especially at the beginning. It was all about survival, buying and selling was my only source of income and essentially became like a safety net. Around 2014 I fell upon a deadstock spot whilst partying with friends in Amsterdam and literally it was like how i’d imagine winning the lottery would feel – a small shop in plain sight with some of the best t-shirts in the world tucked away at the back behind miscellaneous oddities. I went back and forth to that spot for the next 4-5 years just buying t-shirts I believed were valuable and then over time I found myself learning on the job and educating myself on different genres of music. I grew up listening to shoegaze, brit pop and of course hip-hop so with the other genres available to me it was almost trial and error. I very quickly found myself in situation where there was so much demand for what I was selling it didn’t take long for me to have a network of serious buyers globally who’d buy anything I wasn’t personally interested in and in bulk so it meant I could almost give anything a go. The progression to working for myself full time happened organically without me really having much time to think about it. 

You also recently started a rare poster brand also, how did this come about?

The t-shirt market has been overly saturated for a while now and it’s becoming increasingly harder to find t-shirts at a reasonable price let alone affordable so I’d been looking to diversify for a while into something that my client base could relate to. Posters seemed like the most natural choice I lived through the era so many people reference now 90s-00s and when I was growing up t-shirts, posters and magazines all came hand in hand. At the moment there’s not many people within the vintage t-shirt community actively selling original posters and I’ve actually noticed since I took the step and gave it ago a lot more dealers have followed suit as it’s a no brainer really. There’s a lot of t-shirts out there that I’ll never be able to find but at the moment that’s not the same with original posters.

HIP Exploring The World Of Vintage New Order Merch With Ladi Kazeem
HIP Exploring The World Of Vintage New Order Merch With Ladi Kazeem

What gives you the biggest buzz – the sourcing or the selling?

Sourcing of course I think anyone who works within t-shirts or more broadly vintage and does their own sourcing will agree with me that’s kind of why I’m in no rush to expand my team and turn this into a operation where I have no creative input and hand it all over to people to make money for me, where’s the fun in that? Some of my best finds have been from vintage shops in the UK where the stock comes in bails and the staff members just stick the t-shirts out like you would in any retail operation. They’re not being paid to know above and beyond what they’re selling so people like myself clean up weekly just checking every vintage store routinely. I’ve literally found some of the rarest t-shirts on the current market worth in thousands sat collecting dust in a vintage store bargain basement.   

Buying and selling tees online seems to be constantly changing with virtual auctions on IG live a normal occurrence since lockdown, where do you see selling vintage tees going next in terms of innovation and community?

Well with the vintage t-shirt market specifically it doesn’t really matter who you are if someone comes across you and you have rare items at an affordable price you’re always going to be quids in. The issue is with all these algorithm base platforms and a more saturated marketplace it’s becoming harder and harder to just find dealers online. It’s like when I first started selling t-shirts online socially I didn’t have a presence but having said that there was literally no competition especially in the UK, in fact my only competitor sold t shirts 3 times the price of mine so I’d sell out daily. But now again with a more saturated market presentation, curation, quality and knowledge of what you’re selling is key to stay relevant and different ways of selling like online auctions or popups or yard sales where your connecting with your buyers and then it becomes more personal. I wouldn’t be surprised if vintage auction houses began to spring up all over the UK with the same principle of any auction house, people bidding up items and an auctioneer with a hammer having the final say.

HIP Exploring The World Of Vintage New Order Merch With Ladi Kazeem


You were based in Manchester for a time, how was that for finding New Order tees and other Manchester related band tees?

The North of England and Manchester specifically is like nowhere else in the world everyone has got a story to tell anyone from Salford will tell you they know Peter Hook New Orders bassist and every grafter especially at the united and city games will have sold at some point in there illustrious  bootlegging careers a New Order t-shirt – so if they don’t have one themselves to sell they’ll know somebody who will and that’s how Manchester worked for me.

Do you have a person favourite New Order moment?

The US tour in 1989 was iconic for me mainly because of who they were touring with which was Public Image Limited and Sugarcubes which included a young Björk who in t-shirts terms are both pretty iconic. Cubes t-shirts are quite valuable but Björk t-shirts are on another planet and extremely sought after. I think any football fan worth his salt will have heard or know about the 1990 track “World In Motion” where John Barnes spat some lyrics again which was iconic.

What’s next for the vault?

I’m heading back to the North next year and then who knows hopefully COVID’s a thing of past come next year and I can get back to travelling the world unearthing lost relics in dusty deadstock spots. There is no timeframe none of this needs to be rushed in my opinion I’m just doing what I enjoy and thankfully being able to live reasonably in the process. 

Follow Ladi Kazeem here and TheVaultMCR here.

The adidas Spezial AW20 Chapter 2 _nwrdrSPZL collection is online now.

HIP Exploring The World Of Vintage New Order Merch With Ladi Kazeem
HIP Exploring The World Of Vintage New Order Merch With Ladi Kazeem
HIP Exploring The World Of Vintage New Order Merch With Ladi Kazeem
HIP Exploring The World Of Vintage New Order Merch With Ladi Kazeem
HIP Exploring The World Of Vintage New Order Merch With Ladi Kazeem
HIP Exploring The World Of Vintage New Order Merch With Ladi Kazeem
HIP Exploring The World Of Vintage New Order Merch With Ladi Kazeem
HIP Exploring The World Of Vintage New Order Merch With Ladi Kazeem
HIP Exploring The World Of Vintage New Order Merch With Ladi Kazeem

adidas Spezial AW20 Chapter 2 _nwrdrSPZL

Gary Aspden’s adidas Originals SPEZIAL line presents chapter 2 of AW20 with _nwrdrSPZL – an official collaboration with iconic Manchester based electronic rock band New Order. The collection is heavily based around the repeated three block New Order ‘Tour’ graphic that the band have used for recent live performances in anticipation of new music being released by the […]

Gary Aspden’s adidas Originals SPEZIAL line presents chapter 2 of AW20 with _nwrdrSPZL – an official collaboration with iconic Manchester based electronic rock band New Order. The collection is heavily based around the repeated three block New Order ‘Tour’ graphic that the band have used for recent live performances in anticipation of new music being released by the band for the first time in 5 years. Founder and curator of adidas Spezial Gary Aspden, is a long time friend and fan of New Order with the collaboration being born out of their long-standing organic relationship. The adidas Spezial team and New Order worked closely on the project, with New Order traveling over to Herzogenaurach (adidas HQ) for each design meeting and sample review.

The collection is led by the the Wilsy SPZL, which was an obvious choice as a style Bernard Sumner has worn on stage consistently during New Order’s recent live shows. This one-off New Order version arrives in a premium clean white leather with a white translucent sole along with updated vamp details, co-branding and the subtle addition of white eyelets. The footbed carries the coloured ‘Tour’ graphic and the shoes with interchangeable branded lace jewels and reflective laces that offer a colour stab to a limited release of this iconic silhouette.

Moving focus to outerwear in the collection, the collection’s standout jacket is inspired by Bernard Sumner’s love of sailing with a parka in a coated woven fabric with a mesh lining and features ‘hidden in plain sight’ tonal reflective branding and stripes. Finer details include a distinctive see through hood window panels and a New Order sleeve patch – which are both synonymous with yachting jackets. The Manchester appropriate tonal grey of the jacket is lifted by a detachable and interchangeable colour-pop pullers to allow the wearer to customise the look of the piece.

Hailing from Manchester, New Order’s authentic connection to football culture is referenced through a football jersey that uses their repeated ‘Tour’ graphic in a tonal engineered jacquard base fabric with elasticated ribbing on the neck and sleeve. The shirt is finished off with Latin script used in the ‘Mod Trefoil’ badging along with a twist on modern football kit sponsorship with the use of song title ‘586’ across the chest. Continuing the sporting theme, The New Order track jacket lands in a clean navy made using recycled PES blend pique material. The jacket takes inspiration from classic adidas track jackets (particularly the signature argyle print of Ivan Lendl) and re-appropriates that look and feel with a repeated print of their ‘Tour’ graphic sitting above the hem.  Rounding off the collection is a graphic logo tee in heather grey cotton and uses the ‘_nwrdSPZL’ graphic underpinned by ‘True Faith’ in Latin.

The adidas Originals Spezial AW20 Chapter 2 _nwrdrSPZL collection is online now and in both our Leeds and Nottingham stores.

adidas Spezial AW20 Chapter 1

Following on from the release of the adidas SPEZIAL ‘Made for HIP’ Elland, Gary Aspden’s adidas Originals SPEZIAL imprint returns with a new collection of footwear and apparel for AW20 inspired by terrace culture and adidas’ rich archive. Spanning across a wide variety of silhouettes, each piece takes reference from the deep adidas Originals archives, procuring lesser […]

HIP adidas Spezial AW20

Following on from the release of the adidas SPEZIAL ‘Made for HIP’ Elland, Gary Aspden’s adidas Originals SPEZIAL imprint returns with a new collection of footwear and apparel for AW20 inspired by terrace culture and adidas’ rich archive.

Spanning across a wide variety of silhouettes, each piece takes reference from the deep adidas Originals archives, procuring lesser known styles from the past with new life through unique hybrids that people have come to expect from adidas Spezial.

Footwear is spearheaded by the reworked HRMNY SPZL – an archival style from the original Torsion range which was originally a woman’s shoe and revered by German football fans. Following in the paths of previous leisure shoes, the Newrad SPZL is an all new silhouette arriving in light brown nubuck built on the Bermuda tooling and branded with an embossed ‘Mod Trefoil’ patch to the lateral side. The Alderley SPZL is a new Spezial court inspired hybrid that takes the foundations of its design from the mesh and foxing of the Rod Laver Vintage with a distinctive perforated leather toe. Footwear in the collection is rounded off with a pair of adilette slides with the debossed Mod Trefoil relief and Spezial branding.

The apparel side of the collection sees the return of an adidas Spezial favourite with the SL Haslingden jacket – widely regarded as one of Spezial’s most popular jackets ever, this time constructed in a super lightweight fabric with tonal 3 stripe branding. The ST11 is a newly developed jacket that comes in a bold gold colourway and draws inspiration from the silhouettes of the Standard Training of the late 70s with an updated colour, materials and fit. Additional staples apparel styles include the Mod Trefoil sweat in a chalk white Terry, white logo carrier tee, tapered navy track pant and trace green cargo short in the classic ‘Aldwych’ fit. A multi panel, peaked, logo cap in a warm beige with adjustable fit and three vent holes rounds of the collection.

The adidas Originals Spezial AW20 Chapter 1 collection is online now and in both our Leeds and Nottingham stores.

HIP adidas Spezial AW20
HIP adidas Spezial AW20
HIP adidas Spezial AW20
HIP adidas Spezial AW20